Posted in Information Article

A Yearly Exam Might Aid in Isolating Slow Thinking

yearly doctors examination photo

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ugar creates addicts out of us. It seduces us, squashes our will and has us coming back for more and more. A current article in amednews.com explains that a diet of foods high in fructose has been blamed for a variety of health conditions, including cardiovascular disease , and will also make you forgetful. Nutritionists at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine tested lab rats to explore how a diet of processed sugar can affect preliminary cognitive abilities such as thinking and memory. Their research determined that consuming too much corn-syrup sugar disturbs the insulin activity needed for problem solving and memory. At Steppie MD, certified dietitians conclude that supplementing a high-fructose meal plan with fish oils may lowered the negative impact of the extremely sweet foods. Nonetheless, there’s a viable reason as to why others love to eat sugary foods after a calling it quits. Fast food makes them forget.

Uniquely, there are no procedures in a routine checkup. A few individuals do not have routine ways, to identify blood sugar problems before more serious ones occur. Medical questions about feelings of depression and thinking problems, may lead to interventions that make major improvements. An increasing number of people in America have metabolic syndrome and likely do not know it, but fish oils may provide memory loss improvements to offset the negative effects of corn syrup solids. A good doctor might be fast or slow, based on their medical style and the patient’s pre-existing condition.

A lowered consumption of high-fructose corn syrup might provide improvements in brainpower. Medical interventions for cardio-metabolic syndrome include routine exercise and a better diet. Blood sugar levels may be monitored in the patient’s leg and finger. In advance of developing symptoms of metabolic syndrome and thinking problems, your family physician may see abnormal risk factors that suggest sugar-related disease. If you feel good and have a normal exam, it is likely you are healthy. Your siblings may have metabolic syndrome, but even with a strongly inherited predisposition you can cut your risks dramatically by pursuing a diet high in n-3 fatty acids.

According to HelpGuide.org “Healthy eating is not about strict nutrition philosophies, staying unrealistically thin, or depriving yourself of the foods you love. Rather, it’s about feeling great, having more energy, stabilizing your mood, and keeping yourself as healthy as possible—all of which can be achieved by learning some nutrition basics and using them in a way that works for you. You can expand your range of healthy food choices and learn how to plan ahead to create and maintain a tasty, healthy diet.”

LiveStrong has this to say about healthy eating: “Despite the confusion that massive marketing campaigns may have created, healthful eating is not complicated and is possible for everyone to follow. Whether your goal is to gain muscle, lose weight or simply maintain your current weight, following a healthful diet is paramount to your success. You should be familiar with the fundamentals of healthy eating if you are serious about your health and fitness.”

About the author:
This article was created in cooperation with SteppieMD.  Learn more about them on Facebook and Twitter.

Author:

Beloved KEPT Child of Jesus stumbling by faith ~ Married 30 years ~ Blessed Mama of 10 beside me & 2 at Jesus' feet ~ "Retired" homeschool mama of 22 years ~ Writer * Blogger * Reviewer ~

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