Book Review: Worlds Apart by Luke Loaghan

H

aving graduated from high school in 1982, I found this fictional story, Worlds Apart about a high school boy named, David, during the time period of the 80′s quite interesting and reminiscent, yet so thankful I did not have to deal with many of the worries he did, especially the gang activity.  David was an extremely intelligent, sports editor the the school newspaper, and yet did not feel he fit in the elite high school he attended.  He also lives with regret of his mom dying several years before from cancer.  He was the oldest son, and responsible for giving her medication.  On the day she died, he came home a half hour late, finding her dead.  He then  lives with his dad and brother through his high school years. He did not rate it high being in the elite high school and was determined to be a self-made success no matter what college he went to, and it did not have to be one that set his status high.

In Worlds Apart the drama continues for David, from finding a new job, studying for the SAT’s and dealing with crime, Chinese gangs, and violence which is  taking over New York City, and faces decisions with friends having guns and hearing of suicides and deaths.  He tries to fit in by getting a modern haircut and dressing totally different and numerous asked him if he was in the Deceptors Gang.

He also waits patiently for a girl, Delancey, who he never thinks will like him, and eventually they begin a sweet relationship.  And this is where the books name, Worlds Apart comes from, as this girl, is from another world.  This is the first time he goes to her dad’s appartment where she lives:

The apartment appeared designed by an interior decorator. I glanced around and saw Central Park from the windows. shimmered in the polished beige marble floors. The apartment had rich mahogany doors with furniture to match. Her kitchen was out of Architectural Digest. A feeling of anxiety overtook me. The apartment was a reminder that Delancey and I came from two different worlds. She was still out of my league, even though we were friends. If I ever brought her home, it would be the end of our friendship. The stark reality of my lifestyle would painfully remind her of how poor I was.

The story takes many twists and turns, much of terror I am thankful I nor my children ever had to face,  Though not a Christian book, it is a quick reading book following a young man’s life that is sadly realistic of what some kids have to face in gang filled cities.

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